October sees the annual launch of National Home Security Month (NHSM), a nationwide initiative aimed at raising awareness of home security. Hannah Adkins, Marketing Executive for NHSM’s headline sponsor Yale, gives us her five top tips on securing the home of someone with dementia.

1. Lock it up

It sounds simple, but ensure door and window security is up to scratch. Doors and windows are the primary methods for burglars to enter and exit properties with 33% simply entering through an open front door*. Even changing the basics in home security can make a big difference and upgrading your locks is easy. Locks should comply with the British Standard BS3621 and cylinders should meet the TS007 3 star standard. Look for the British Kitemark symbol.

2. Discourage burglars

There are a number of measures you can install to deter a burglar from considering your property as a potential target. CCTV systems, burglar alarms and outdoor lighting not only provide added security, notifying you to an intruder, they also act as a visual deterrent. In fact, 60% of burglaries attempted on houses with alarm systems failed. As technology evolves, these systems have become more sophisticated and can aid people with dementia. For example, integrated burglar alarms and CCTV systems can now send notifications and email alerts to a users smartphone when triggered. This is ideal, as they can be sent to a relative’s device so they can check on security and their family member’s safety.

3. Go key free

As seen with the alarm and CCTV systems, new and developing technology can aid those living with dementia and make life that little bit easier. Smart locks are one such security measure that is doing just that. Smart locks, such as Yale’s Keyless connected smart lock, can be unlocked using a key card, keytag, remote fob or even a smartphone when connected to a smart home system. Pin codes can be set for certain times of the day and given to carers, relatives and house help, such as cleaners to let them into the property securely without having to get up and down, answering to unknown callers or losing keys.

4. Eye spy

A threat when leaving vulnerable people home alone is distraction burglaries. This involves a trick or lie to get into a property either by posing as someone of authority or keeping you at the front door while someone accesses the property through a different entry point. Investing in a digital door viewer means that you can see who is at the door without compromising your home security.

5. Play it safe

To protect small valuable items, use a home safe securely bolted to the floor or wall. This way, important information cannot be lost or discarded as well as preventing thieves from stealing personal belongings.

For more information and advice on home security visit www.homesecuritymonth.com, or alternatively search for National Home Security Month on Facebook and Twitter.
*Research by Safewise