We were humbled to see so many Facebook group members this week discussing how they deal with their loved one’s incontinence. It was particularly heartening to see people share their tips, advice and experiences with each other in such an open and honest way. Incontinence can be such a difficult and upsetting subject, but it needn’t be taboo, and talking about it with others who really understand, can be an enormous help.

Unforgettable has lots of free advice to help make life a bit easier for you and the person you care about, whether you simply want more information or have a particular issue you’re finding difficult. Below we’ve selected some of our most popular articles about incontinence, the challenges it brings and how to cope.

How to help a loved one with dementia use the toilet
Does the person you love need a little help when they go to the loo? This sensitivity written article, by professional carer and nurse Daphne Simpson, explains how to offer practical help whilst also respecting their privacy. It contains a useful step by step guide too.

Incontinence in dementia: What, why and when
This down to earth advice article explains why people with dementia can become incontinent (there are more reasons than you may think).

Your 4-step plan to dealing with incontinence and dementia
This practical plan was created to help ease fears about incontinence and prevent it from limiting your life.

Top products to help with incontinence and hygiene in dementia
This detailed guide explains the different types of products you might come across to make the toileting process easier, more hygienic and most importantly perhaps, more dignified for the person you care about. It describes the wide range of products available on the market, including the different kinds of incontinence pads and pants, special toilet seats, alarms, and personal hygiene products. Overall, this could be very useful if you’re feeling overwhelmed and not sure what you need.

STILL can’t find what you need?
Don’t despair. Sometimes you just need to let off steam or share what you’re going through with others who understand (and who may have some bright ideas to help). Join the Unforgettable Dementia Support Group on Facebook and meet our warm and friendly community of caregivers and people with dementia. We’re sure you’ll receive a very warm welcome.