Getting active could have a protective effect against dementia, says new study.

Research into how exercise can be beneficial in the prevention of dementia has discovered that it’s the production of a particular protein during exercise which could help improve brain cell function and reduce the risk of developing dementia.

Experiments on mice found running on an exercise wheel increased the production of a protein called SIRT3, which is found in mitochondria, the powerhouse of cells.

The research was carried out by Dr Mark Mattson, of John Hopkins University in Baltimore, and he discovered that SIRT3 could help resist the effect of stress on brain cells, which could in turn help to protect the brain from degeneration which could potentially lead to neurodegenerative disease such as Alzheimer’s.

Dr Mattson believes the research could be used to help in the development of gene therapy, which could help protect against dementia.

‘These findings suggest bolstering mitochondrial function and stress resistance by increasing SIRT3 levels may offer a promising therapeutic target for protecting against age-related cognitive decline and brain diseases,’ he said.

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Find out what else you can do to help reduce your chances of developing dementia by clicking here.