A quick new test which claims to accurately diagnose Lewy body dementia has recently been unveiled.

US scientists have developed a test which could significantly speed up the diagnosis process of Lewy body dementia (LBD), currently the second most common form of dementia.

Dementia with Lewy bodies affects more than 100,000 people in the UK but can be particularly difficult to diagnose accurately since it shares many symptoms with both Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

However, accurate diagnosis is essential because people with LBD can be highly sensitive to certain drugs which they may otherwise be offered.

The new test consists of ten questions about the signs and symptoms of LBD which can include tremors, hallucinations and mobility issues, as well as memory loss. Dr James Galvin, who developed the test at Florida Atlantic University, hopes it can speed up the diagnosis process (which can currently be delayed by up to 18 months) and ensure people living with LBD receive appropriate medication and support.

‘It has the potential to provide a clearer, more accurate picture for those patients who are unable to be seen by specialists, hastening the correct diagnosis and reducing the strain and burden placed on patients and caregivers,’ he explains.

Studies so far have shown the test – entitled the Lewy Body Composite Risk Score (LBCRS) to have a 96.8 per cent accuracy rate.